best blogs

I deliberately spent the break away from work stuff – including reading work stuff, work-ish blogs, and blogging myself – and the break has afforded me the opportunity to get a little perspective on my blog-roll.

Coming back to it, my top five (of 33) are:

1/ calculated risk is great for the ‘facts’ as to what’s going on in the US; there is an opening for a global equivalent (or strong GBP, EUR, Japan and China equivalents);
2/ FT Alphaville brings me up to speed on what’s going on in markets;
3/ The Grumpy Economist says it better than i’m able on most topics ;
4/ Econbrowser is my favourite blog when Jim posts;
5/ Falkenblog is incomparable (it’d be higher up, but it’s not my everyday cup of tea).

what’s your top five?

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6 Responses to best blogs

  1. Manny C says:

    I checked out my Google Reader stats and these are the blogs of which I have read the highest proportion of posts to postings.

    Eco stuff:
    1. FTalphaville: these guys are like a mini research house. Learn so much from read this blog. It doesn’t have the snarky, conspiratorial edge of ZeroHedge (which I no longer subscribe to).
    2. Marginal Revolution: Tyler Cowen is an aggregation machine. I can see eco debates break out via his linkages. And I like some of his original stuff.
    3. Calculated Risk: great stuff there. Incredible wealth of eco only stuff, albeit on occasion with a Keynesian tinge.
    4. (Surprise Surprise) The Money Illusion: Scott Sumner is one of the most “heterodox” (Chicago school) economists out there. He would dispute that. And having read some papers from the early nineties from various eco researchers, I think he has a point. He seemed to have missed the last 20 yrs of economics (jking). He is very smart, witty and not afraid to be a contrarian. I like that. Plus he reckons he can solve all the world’s problems (it’s all NGDP expectations stupid!). Plus he gives Krugman heartburn. I know you have reservations about some of his stuff, but it really is gold a lot of the time.
    5. Econbrowser: you put me on to this one. Menzies’ stuff is a bit too intense for a blog format, but Jim’s is incredibly insightful.

    See this related Economist article:
    http://www.economist.com/node/21542174

    Overall:
    1. FTa
    2. Appleinsider
    3. Daring Fireball
    4. Marginal Revolution
    5. Calculated Risk

  2. On your Marx says:

    I agree on both CR and Econbrowser ( I do like Menzies and his econometrics).

    I would add,
    Krugman ( No 1 and is always in ‘debate’ with someone and always has great links to very good articles),
    Mark Thoma ( Economist’s view) both for the articles and the links
    and for an OZ perspective Stphen Koukoulas’s blog.

    Just for the intellectual stimulation David Glasner’s ( Uneasy Money) blog is fantastic

    FT is more a resource than a blog per se’

    • Ricardo says:

      I like Krugman, for his ‘economic story-telling’ – no one does it better. But i do find him a little one sided at times. The recent recardian equivalence debate, for example, has not gone well for him.

      Sent from my iPad

  3. On your Marx says:

    Scott is a good read but seems to want to ‘take on Krugman’ too often.

    See David Glasner for his present errors.

    I should be quite complementary about your blog. I put Stephen ahead of you simply because he puts more stuff out. Very hard call if volumes were similar.

    There are sooo many good blogs now it is fantastic

  4. on your Marx says:

    don’t worry you are a must read and a good read.

    young Noah Smith in the US is another like David Glasner who gets your grey matter going.

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